This Is Why You Should Put A Bar Of Soap Under Your Sheets At Night!

What is soap?

In chemistry, a soap is a salt of a fatty acid. Household uses for soaps include washing, bathing, and other types of housekeeping, where soaps act as surfactants, emulsifying oils to enable them to be carried away by water. In industry they are also used in textile spinning and are important components of some lubricants. Metal soaps are also included in modern artists’ oil paints formulations as a rheology modifier.

Soaps for cleaning are obtained by treating vegetable or animal oils and fats with a strong base, such as sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide in an aqueous solution. Fats and oils are composed of triglycerides; three molecules of fatty acids attach to a single molecule of glycerol. The alkaline solution, which is often called lye (although the term “lye soap” refers almost exclusively to soaps made with sodium hydroxide), induces saponification.

In this reaction, the triglyceride fats first hydrolyze into free fatty acids, and then the latter combine with the alkali to form crude soap: an amalgam of various soap salts, excess fat or alkali, water, and liberated glycerol (glycerin). The glycerin, a useful byproduct, can remain in the soap product as a softening agent, or be isolated for other uses.

Soaps are key components of most lubricating greases, which are usually emulsions of calcium soap or lithium soap and mineral oil. Many other metallic soaps are also useful, including those of aluminum, sodium, and mixtures of them. Such soaps are also used as thickeners to increase the viscosity of oils. In ancient times, lubricating greases were made by the addition of lime to olive oil.

 

How soap is made?

The industrial production of soap involves continuous processes, such as continuous addition of fat and removal of product. Smaller-scale production involves the traditional batch processes. The three variations are the cold process, wherein the reaction takes place substantially at room temperature; the semi-boiled or “hot process,” wherein the reaction takes place near the boiling point; and the fully boiled process, wherein the reactants are boiled at least once and the glycerol is recovered. There are several types of semi-boiled hot process methods, the most common being DBHP (Double Boiler Hot Process) and CPHP (Crock Pot Hot Process). Most soapmakers, however, continue to prefer the cold process method. The cold process and hot process (semi-boiled) are the simplest, and are typically used by small artisans and hobbyists producing handmade decorative soaps. The glycerol remains in the soap and the reaction continues for many days after the soap is poured into molds. The glycerol is left during the hot-process method, but at the high temperature employed, the reaction is practically completed in the kettle, before the soap is poured into molds. This simple and quick process is employed in small factories all over the world.

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